• the hired hand soundtrack – bruce langhorne

    out of stock

    getting down to the last copies on this one. lots of folks who’ve grabbed this one on a whim have emailed back saying how much they dig it. so yeah dont sleep.
    wonderful sparse & minimal soundtrack with laidback rural rock/guitar instrumentals and more.
    highly recommended.
    -josh/tomentosa




    label descrip:
    Bruce Langhorne’s film score to Peter Fonda’s 1971 cult classic “The Hired Hand” was Bruce’s first solo album and Peter Fonda’s directoral debut and it’s just now seeing it’s first and limited appearance on vinyl and fittingly Scissor Tail Editions inaugural vinyl release. Bruce Langhorne is most known for his session work with artists in and around the Greenwich Village folk scene during the 1960’s.

    He’s been credited as working with such artists as Bob Dylan, Odetta, Joan Baez, Peter, Paul and Mary, Babatunde Olatunji, Richie Havens, Carolyn Hester, Peter LaFarge, Gordon Lightfoot, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Ramblin’ Jack Elliot… practically everyone active during that era. In addition to being the inspiration for Bob Dylan’s “Mr. Tambourine Man”, Langhorne also played the electric guitar countermelody on the song. His guitar is also prominent on several other songs on Dylan’s Bringing It All Back Home album, particularly “Love Minus Zero/No Limit” and “She Belongs to Me”, but also “Subterranean Homesick Blues”, “Outlaw Blues”, “Bob Dylan’s 115th Dream” and “Maggie’s Farm”, on which he played the lead guitar part. He also played the guitar with Dylan for Dylan’s television performances of “It’s Alright Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” and “It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue on the Les Crane Show a month after the Bringing It All Back Home sessions. Two years earlier, Langhorne had performed on Dylan’s The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan on “Corrina, Corrina” as well as the outtake “Mixed-Up Confusion”.

    In 1969 Langhorne was asked by Peter Fonda to score his directorial debut. He decided to opt out of scoring the film in a projection room, instead chose to shoot the film onto a small black and white camera to take back to his home in Laurel Canyon. He would watch the film and play along to it as his girlfriend at the time would record him and play it back, allowing him to overdub Farfisa Organ, piano, banjo, fiddle, harmonica, recorder, and Appalachian dulcimer onto his Revox reel to reel. Bruce’s 1920 Martin guitar is most prominent throughout the record. The Results were a uniquely wide and lonesome soundscape. The closest comparison might be Sandy Bull or possibly John Fahey, but nothing of its kind or even of it’s time poses a resemblance to Langhorne’s minimal masterpiece displayed here on vinyl for the first time.


  • joan la barbara – voice is the original instrument – arc light editions

    $27.00 Add to cart

    Voice Is The Original Instrument was the first record released by Joan La Barbara in 1976 on Wizard Records. This is the first time the original LP, with artwork, has been made available again. It has since become iconic as one of the initial examples of extended vocal techniques in experimental music. The human voice is the only instrument on the recordings. The works on Voice is the Original Instrument were some of Joan’s earliest compositions, researching the possibilities of the voice, in two rigorous études, “Circular Song” and “Voice Piece: One-Note Internal Resonance Investigation”, and the more free-form “Vocal Extensions”, which uses live electronic processing. “My reason for producing the LP was to get my music out to the world beyond NYC and the major cities in which I was playing concerts,” she says. “At that time, Carla Bley and Michael Mantler had started JCOA/New Music Distribution Service which handled small independent labels, so there were quite a few artists in the NYC area who were producing their own albums and distributing them through that service.” Just out of college and living in a Soho loft in New York, Joan began playing shows in New York with jazz and rock musicians, and with those in the new music scene. “I did commercials, which, strangely enough, led me to Steve Reich,” she says. “A composer I was working with, Michael Sahl hired me to do some radio commercials and suggested me to Reich who was looking for singers who could imitate instruments, which was something I had been working on for some time and was part of my exploration of the voice. I worked with Reich on the development of “Drumming”, imitating the marimba.”