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  • container – spectrum spools

    out of stock

    Recorded Labor Day Weekend 2012, Providence, RI

    Providence, RI’s (recently relocated from Nashville, TN) Container returns with another slab of alternate universe bent techno. Schofield’s take on that over used genre is not only unique but utterly compelling, forming a modern and exciting new sound. While the classic Container sound is still in tact, this album offers a look into a previously closed door in the Container sound world.

    “LP”, like its predecessor “LP”, is recorded in mono and its cuts right down the middle of your skull, and doesn’t float around in imaginary room, these new tracks are immediate and heavy. Kicking off the delayed trip of “Dripping”, a rhythmic bone akin to a rusty swing in a ghetto playground, morphs seamlessly into complex maze that is “Paralyzed”. Closing the side is a real stomper head-cleaner of a track, the mighty “Acclimator”.

    Side B opens with “Perforate”, a bass line straight from Mute-era D.A.F, which mutates into an elastic acid line, building into a full rhythm’n’noise spectacle. The disc closes proper with the mad rush for the bar that is the epic “Refract”. LP is a rough and raw ride, adding very much needed gristle to pale face of the stagnant minimal scene.


  • container – lp – spectrum spools

    out of stock

    Container is a recent moniker of Nashville, Tennessee resident Ren Schofield, who has been actively shifting about the U.S. playing shows and releasing cassettes on his mysterious I Just Live Here imprint for a long while now. Known primarily for his God Willing project, a disjointed, confusing maze of crude oscillator, tape, and guitar, Ren has established himself as a staple in the East Coast underground. Here we have a new experiment in electronic beat-oriented music. This is no standard fare, however. It glows with a vision all its own, completely isolated and separate, making it difficult to place in the awkward world of the “genre.” The sounds are a thick stew, congealing new ideas and naive experiments into something in the ballpark of the new super-weird Wolfgang Voigt 12″s, abstract and minimal in nature with time-stopping tendencies . Take those 12″s and send them through the garbage can, tape loop, reel-to-reel experiments of Ake Hodell’s “220 Volt Buddha” or that weird track with a lawnmower by Charles Amirkhanian on the first Slowscan volume and we might be getting closer. This music, by being so unruly and defiant of any kind of trend, has created a fresh fusion we have not heard until now. “Application” introduces you to Container in the most suitable way. A confusing anti-rhythm accompanied by eerie, unidentifiable tones before a collapse of metallic drum sounds washes you out into the minimal, motorik “Protrusion.” The flip takes off with intense feedback squeal and more light speed rhythm, leading into “Overflow,” the album’s wildest, most textural piece. “Rattler” leaves the listener absolutely baffled and flipping the record over again to try to figure it all out as this record makes no sense to anybody but its creator. The experimental nature of this album alone warrants its vinyl release; however, the fine detail and unique structures will have you waiting for the next Container 12″. Mastered and cut at Dubplates & Mastering, Berlin, July 2011. Design and layout assistance by Mike Pollard.


  • form a log – the two benji’s – dechorence records

    $16.00 Add to cart

    Form A Log is composed of 3 members, all of whom make original music on their own and have a history in the underground noise/weirdness scene. Ren Schofield is also Container. Noah Anthony is also Profligate. Rick Weaver is also Dinner Music.

    Form A Log only plays cassettes loaded with samples on 4-track players. The music they make is like proto-hip-hop as filtered through the techniques of musique concrete. Or techno as it would be made by time travelers stuck in an era before samplers. Or dance club music in a world where Revolution No.9 was a hit single.

    There have been a number of Form A Log cassette releases, each more developed and advanced than the last. “The Two Benji’s” is the latest evolution and the first to be pressed on vinyl. “The Two Benji’s” is a concept album, but Form A Log may not tell you what the concept is. There are clues and hints within. Throw some Benjis. Welcome to Log Culture.


  • container – spectrum spools (clear vinyl)

    out of stock

    clear vinyl

    Recorded Labor Day Weekend 2012, Providence, RI

    Providence, RI’s (recently relocated from Nashville, TN) Container returns with another slab of alternate universe bent techno. Schofield’s take on that over used genre is not only unique but utterly compelling, forming a modern and exciting new sound. While the classic Container sound is still in tact, this album offers a look into a previously closed door in the Container sound world.

    “LP”, like its predecessor “LP”, is recorded in mono and its cuts right down the middle of your skull, and doesn’t float around in imaginary room, these new tracks are immediate and heavy. Kicking off the delayed trip of “Dripping”, a rhythmic bone akin to a rusty swing in a ghetto playground, morphs seamlessly into complex maze that is “Paralyzed”. Closing the side is a real stomper head-cleaner of a track, the mighty “Acclimator”.

    Side B opens with “Perforate”, a bass line straight from Mute-era D.A.F, which mutates into an elastic acid line, building into a full rhythm’n’noise spectacle. The disc closes proper with the mad rush for the bar that is the epic “Refract”. LP is a rough and raw ride, adding very much needed gristle to pale face of the stagnant minimal scene.


  • god willing – landfill

    out of stock

    used
    edition of 50
    IJLH 015


  • alley vision

    out of stock

    Ren Schofield (Age Wave, I Just Live Here Records) & I collaborated during a weekend of “St. Louis Goof” in addition to a couple of aluminum Nashville days. Had a good time editing it last week and the result was surprising: a coherent 46 minute album that covers a lot of ground. Side A sounds like something that would’ve come out in the early ’70s – electronic stream of consciousness – largely driven by analog synth, tape loops, and Apollo drums, on the “beautiful” side of things, until the last ten minutes, which gets “out there” with tapes, organ egg shells, and a couple of phase-heavy 4 track recordings.. Side B employs some “log culture” as well as some heavier frequency territory and ends with a free rock duel smashed analog and digital reverb?

    Permanent affliction – permanent alley vision… No drinks spilled.