editions mego

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  • emeralds – what happened- editions mego

    out of stock

    Edition of 300 copies on transparent yellow vinyl, in a gatefold sleeve.


    Editions Mego is chuffed to release these vintage synth-guitar improvisation jams recorded straight to tape, 2007-2008. Previously released as a CD by No Fun, this is now the definitive vinyl edition of this material, and serves as archival insight into the development of Emeralds’ sound over the last years. Mastered by James Plotkin. Cut at Dubplates & Mastering, Berlin.


  • thought broadcast – votive zero – editions mego

    $19.00 Add to cart

    Formed in opposition to the media identity schizophrenia of the present, Thought Broadcast thrive upon the post-punk tactics of forgery and radical anonymity. Votive Zero is the second release on Editions Mego from this mysteriously coded American outfit. Emerging from the U.S. noise/punk background, Thought Broadcast further trace a unique path with nine carefully-considered obfuscations of rhythm and blurred takes on expressionism. Utilizing minimalist spaces, rhythmic repetition and material textures, Votive Zero navigates psycho-geometries while bathing in a lost, dubplate-style fidelity. Within this construction, past and present are unified as a hazily paranoid exploration of electronic music’s nebulous grey zone. From the damaged mystery of “07/13/2013” to the smeared beats of “Carving a Vow” and Morse code mantra of “Runaway Signal,” this ambiguous release treads a subtle and suspicious path where secrets once hidden are revealed on further, deeper listens. Votive Zero is a sustained journey through raw, hand-rendered minimal electronics which advance the cause and effect of Thought Broadcast’s strategic occurrences. Mastered and cut at Dubplates & Mastering, March 2014. Artwork by Ravi Binning.


  • emeralds – just to feel anything – emego

    $17.00 Add to cart

    Written, Recorded and Mixed in June 2012 at Tangerine Sound in Akron, Ohio.
    Recorded by Andrew Veres.
    Mixed by Andrew Veres and Emeralds.
    Mastered by James Plotkin.
    Vinyl cut at Dubplates & Mastering, Berlin, August 2012.

    Artwork and typography by Mark Fell.
    Front cover photograph by Mark McGuire.
    Back cover photograph by Steve Hauschildt.
    Layout assistance by Michael Pollard.

    Emeralds is Mark McGuire, Steve Hauschildt and John Elliott.

    Thanks to Russell Brill, Mark Fell, Peter Rehberg, Jamie Stillman and Ben Vehorn

    Special thanks to Andrew Veres

    Just to Feel Anything, the new album by Emeralds, surpasses all expectations, just as its predecessor, Does It Look Like I’m Here, did in 2010. This expertly recorded new album sees the band deliver plenty of their distinctive aesthetic for old fans to enjoy while offering a new range of fresh, exciting ideas for newcomers.

    ‘Before Your Eyes’ begins the record with a steady build-up, which bleeds into humid layers of synthesizer pads and warm guitar. The track sets the tone perfectly for ‘Adrenochrome’, a fast-paced excursion into new territory for the band. The calm after the storm appears in the form of ‘Through & Through’, with its contemplative strokes and heart-wrenching atmospherics. ‘Everything Is Inverted’ is an energetic rush of monolithic guitar leads, pulsing drum machine, and driving sequences.

    Still, it’s on the second half of Just to Feel Anything, a triptych of tracks, where Emeralds adroitly demonstrate why they are a cut above their contemporaries. ‘The Loser Keeps America Clean’ kicks off the b-side by diving into the deepest fathoms of their experimental oeuvre. As the final bursts of static dissipate we are led into the opening chords of the eponymous ‘Just to Feel Anything’ a new zenith in Emeralds’ repertoire. The album closer, ‘Search For Me in the Wasteland’ sees mounting layers of brightly strummed guitar chords blossom into a storm of color and expertly crafted textures– a truly majestic end to an immense album.

    With Just to Feel Anything, Emeralds shine a laser-sharp light into the future, while preserving their uniquely intelligent historical perspective. The long-awaited next chapter in the Emeralds discography is finally here, emerging as a sophisticated progression in both sound and structure.


  • kevin drumm – shut in – editions mego

    out of stock

    A beautiful piece of easy listening for cabin fever, courtesy of Chicago avant-garde musician Kevin Drumm. Released in an edition of 250 cassettes with archival artwork from the artist himself.


  • antony / fennesz – oneohtrix point never – returnal – editions mego

    out of stock

    reworking of title track of oneohtrix point never’s emego lp

    Hot on the heels of the acclaimed Oneohtrix Point Never Returnal album come these fabulous versions of the title track. Antony swings the mood and strips the track of its delayed harmonized vocals and creates a poignant ballad with OPN’s Daniel Lopatin on piano. Fennesz, on the other hand, sprinkles some of his world-famous majestic stardust over the proceedings. All packaged in dazzling artwork by Stephen O’Malley.
    -editions mego


  • oneohtrix point never – returnal – editions mego

    out of stock

    Gatefold LP version. Returnal is the fourth album from Daniel Lopatin’s Oneohtrix Point Never project, after Betrayed In The Octagon (Deception Island, 2007), Zones Without People (Arbor, 2009) and Russian Mind (No Fun, 2009). All 3 albums being superbly compiled on the Rifts double CD set (No Fun, 2009). It sees Lopatin fine-tune his craft for the creation of deep atmospheres and textures even further. Starting off with the mind-blowing triptych of “Nil Admiari”/”Describing Bodies”/”Stress Waves,” which fires off into a noise/rhythm excess before entering a zone of relative calm, building to the melancholy of the final part. This sets the tone perfectly for the album’s title track, a stunning, out-of-this-world ballad featuring Lopatin’s near-desperate vocal delivery, ending what could be seen as one of his most chilling and thought-provoking sides to-date. The atmosphere is slightly lifted as the darkened sun comes up over the ruins on “Pelham Island Road” and “Where Does Time Go,” with the album closing with edgy broken beats and the fourth-world possible landscapes of “Preyouandi,” which fades into the distance with echoes of the “Returnal” chorus closing the loop. What’s burnt into memory here is Lopatin’s love affair with the long, slow path back home… the cycle… the hypnotic sector… the ghost in the machine… and whether people are making dance music or hip-hop or space head-music or metal, the ouroboros is present in every sector — as it was in Bach’s study, and in the elephant songs of the Ituri forests. Instrumentation: Akai AX-60, Roland Juno-60, Roland MSQ-700, Korg Electribe ES-1, Voice. Recorded using a personal computer. Mastered by James Plotkin. Tape-op & additional engineering by Al Carlson. Awesome spot-varnished cover design by Stephen O’Malley.


  • KFW – occlusions; real-time music for hybrid digital-analogue… – emego

    out of stock

    …Modular Synthesizer. “‘Occlusion’ is a loose framework for a multi-channel, freely-improvised piece of live electronic music, performed without the aid or consent of pre-recorded or even pre-arranged materials of any kind. A given realization will last between 10 and 30 minutes; time is elastic. Every effort has been made to avoid divisible rhythms (although mistakes are occasionally made). Still, I consider it a ‘kind’ of dance music. These two realizations, recorded a week apart at festivals in France and The Netherlands during February 2012, capture the piece (much like those on the Generators LP) in two entirely different iterations, in states of (A) a mildly inebriated bliss & (B) an arbitrarily triggered blind rage. Both recordings were made at 24-bit, 96khz through the absolute cheapest means available to the consumer to do so. They sound fantastic. Occlusions is a companion piece to Generators in that they share the same tool-set; however, it is the free jazz yang to Generator’s minimalist yin. It is not recommended to those seeking meter, melody, cleanliness, or a clearly-outlined organizational sense.”