imminent frequencies

Showing 1–10 of 11 results

  • handful of dust – from a soundtrack to anabase of st-john perse – imminent frequencies

    out of stock

    A Handful of Dust is the duo of New Zealand noisemakers Bruce Russell (The Dead C) and Alastair Galbraith. Incorporating elements of drone, spoken word, minimalism, improvisation and utilizing everything from violin to toy telephone, The Dust crafts a genuinely unique style of free-form music. “From A Soundtrack To The Anabase Of St-John Perse” a tape originally released via Russell’s own Corpus Hermeticum imprint nearly two decades ago finds the duo under the influence of the 1924 poem of the same name and at the height of their creative experimentation.

    c-42


  • emaciator – finality and contradiction – imminent frequencies

    out of stock

    Emaciator is the long-running project of Los Angeles native, Jon Borges (Pedestrian Deposit, Monorail Trespassing). Over the past decade Emaciator has evolved from its early industrial beginnings into the psychedelic bliss it emits today. The first Emaciator release in four years finds Borges crafting ambient columns of sound with masterful attention to texture and depth.


  • tom white – corrugated – imminent frequencies

    $6.00 Add to cart

    Tom White is a London-based artist working in the areas of sound, installation and film. Following recent releases on Chocolate Monk and My Dance The Skull, White presents an intricate collage of manipulated found and appropriated sounds taken from a series of concrète reel to reel tape experiments recorded throughout 2012 and 2013.


  • remnants – tonal fragments – imminent frequencies

    $6.00 Add to cart

    Remnants is the tape music project of Ryan Marino (Imminent Frequencies) and after some time “Tonal Fragments” is Remnants’ return to IF. Using only the sounds of crude cassette tape loops, “Fragments” presents seven minimal compositions of hiss and decay that are informed by a sense of shifting currents and glacial passages. A haunting lullaby of collaged entropy and aural grit form the most fully realized release from this project to date.


  • earthen sea – waves – imminent frequencies

    out of stock

    The first new release by San Francisco’s Jacob Long (ex Mi Ami, Black Eyes) in nearly four years. “Radiation” is classic Earthen Sea- pure tone, sustained keyboards, a meditative monolith. On “Ocean / Stormy” things begin to change, lush keyboards give way to lo-fi field recordings. Pacific waves glisten in the sun just as the storm beings to hit…
    -imminent


  • remnants – vision being – imminent frequencies

    out of stock

    Two side long recordings of recent vocal-based drone experiments. Passages consist of mangled gregorian chants, field recordings and feedback loops all sifted through a pair of contact mics. There are no synths on this tape.
    -imminent


  • santorum -santorum I – imminent frequencies

    out of stock

    Dark minimal analog synth drones.Your warped fragmented dreams are now real.
    “Santorum I is nothing but criminally short 20 minutes. Just as you could expect from the artwork, which features dark image of a woman just standing on some stairs, the music is dark and lonely, promoting feelings of gloom and uncertainty. The first side may be the gloomiest of the two. It’s like a slow churn through an tenebrous passage to which there’s no expiration aside from the physical end of the tape. The second side isn’t as gloomy as its predecessor, but it doesn’t come as much of a revival in feelings, as it’s more of a slow drift, sounding rather dismal, and once again, melancholy. Overall, it creates a wonderful conclusion for once again, criminally short tape. I suppose it may be a good thing, because I’ll certainly be looking forward to Santorum II. Both of these tapes were a bit low-spirited in sound, but done so well. It’s certainly lonely music for lonely people. Essential late night drive or reclusive tunes that are worthy of many listens in the future, as well as anticipation for future sounds from both artists, and label.”
    – Holidays Review


  • remnants – skeptics- imminent frequencies

    out of stock

    Slow transforming keyboard oscillations weave and pulsate on themselves. At times both light and spacious and at other times straight up sinister.

    “Skeptics is a bit hard to put your thumb on an overall sound and feeling for the release when contrasting either side. The first side is warm but rather dreary. It’s not too dark, but certainly not a bright, feel good sound. Overall, it’s rather melancholy with slow moving synth drones that throb around and through one another. The second side takes a rather different sound, starting off very distorted and somewhat abrasive while some brighter synth sounds slowly break through, until a mash of fluttering sounds fully penetrate and then subside once again. Both sides show different sounds, but in my ears, they both maintain a certain melancholy feel, which I think lends itself as a great quality to the release. The artwork is interesting, looking like astral charts or something of the sort.”
    – Holidays Review


  • remnants – decayed tones – imminent frequencies

    out of stock

    Second release by this Brooklyn based project. Blown-out synth and tape manipulations evolve at a glacial pace, often transitioning from excessive low-end to sweeping high-end before fading off.
    -imminent


  • chapels – call it killing you off – imminent frequencies

    $7.00 Add to cart

    If you have ever wondered what it would sound like to sneak into an abandoned Victorian mansion during a blizzard this is it. Translucent voices, bits of metal debris, found sounds and what sounds like some percussion all meld into a collage of frigid archaic beauty. When not running his House of Alchemy label Adam Richards has stayed rather busy the last couple of years maintaining a strong body of work with his Chapels project, creating hauntingly striking sound compositions. Like many Chapels releases the sounds within are opaque and eerie often hard to decipher but I think I like it better that way.