woodsist

Showing 1–10 of 12 results

  • woods – sun and shade – woodsist – cassette

    out of stock

    “Woods is a two-headed dog asleep on the porch and a butterfly on the windowsill… a Janus, a Gemini and a screen door. The sun wont fade and the earworms will not leave, but the jams go on too long for the girl in the back who wonders if her friends are at another bar. Still, the ballads always make her cry. Woods is up there relaying the Woods-feel: Folk-rock, fuzz, tambourines, tapes and raw lunch pulled straight from the yard. Pop songs and other things: Sun and Shade.”
    -Glenn Donaldson


  • nodzzz – innings – woodsist

    $14.00 Add to cart

    innings is the second full-length from garage-pop trio Nodzzz and their first for New York imprint Woodsist. Its simple title is a nod to their origin: songwriting core Anthony Atlas and Sean Paul Presley met playing baseball in Olympia, Washington, and started Nodzzz upon relocating to San Francisco.

    The album offers fourteen discretely memorable songs in the band’s growing idiom—neurotic power-pop antics and jangly, shambolic post-punk—and follows a string of acclaimed records that began with their debut single in 2007, I Don’t Wanna (Smoke Marijuana), which jumpstarted San Francisco cult-DIY label Make a Mess Records (subsequent home of similar debut records by Grass Widow, Brilliant Colors, White Fence and more), and was followed by a beloved, albeit short, seventeen-minute self-titled LP and the True to Life single, both on NYC’s What’s Your Rupture? label


  • purling hiss – public service announcement – woodsist

    $14.00 Add to cart

    Resident guitarist / noise-smith Mike Polizze of Philly jam-punks Birds of Maya takes another one-off vacation with Purling Hiss. Public Service Announcement take a more song-oriented approach than Polizze’s self-titled debut LP (Permanent Records) and its follow-up, Hissteria (Richie Records). With the treble down and the tape-heads bleeding, the LP is a montage of flange-covered tunes, in-the-red and submerged below sea level. “… reminds me of some of my other favorite mystery rock albums, like High Speed and the Afflicted Man’s Get Stoned Ezy, or any Les Rallizes Denudes or Vermonster records–not necessarily in style or attack, but certainly in spirit. This is full-on destroyer guitar rock, with a palpable sense of nothing to lose and everything to prove. To me, it sounds like a serious, sincere statement–and you don’t hear that every day.” –Ripley Johnson (Moon Duo, Wooden Shjips)


  • excepter – late – woodsist

    $5.00 Add to cart

    The 23rd Excepter record: The Late EP. The Black Rust Rush Tour of “High Noon” lore. One track recorded at Oberlin Dionysus Disco, Fall 2009, in I-94 palindrome dub by R/N. One track recorded at 382 Jeff Street by Lala with the TR-808. 2009-2010 edit. Two tracks live on “Presidence Day” at the Glass Lands, February 16th, 2010, by Derek Maxwell, sound engineer. The Late EP returns Excepter to Woodsist. All four tracks are previously unreleased. The Tank Tapes are included as a complimentary bonus digital download with the record. Excepter is New York City’s premiere improvisatory, vocal-and-electronics cosmic beat-box band. Whether on stage, on record or on video, Excepter never gives the expected, and this is no exception… “Tank Tapes displays Excepter’s more inarticulable qualities … it’s stranger, looser, more beautiful.” –Pitchfork


  • royal baths – litanies – woodsist

    $9.00 Add to cart

    “Royal Baths haven’t had it easy. In a city where garage rock reigns supreme and new bands form and fade away with the blink of an eye, it’s tough to get noticed unless your songs can satisfy punk rock attention spans. But with four- to six-minute tracks and slow, methodical drum beats, Royal Baths have won their way into the hearts of even the most raucous audiences–a testament to both the ability that San Franciscans have to recognize talent when they see it, and also to the incredible music and spectacle that the Royal Baths have created. “The band has its obvious influences–The Velvet Underground and Spacemen 3–but to define them by these comparisons would be to vastly oversimplify their sound. Songwriters Jeremy Cox and Jigmae Baer draw from psychedelic soundscapes; dark, personal, and esoteric subject matter; and a bit of punk’s apathetic humor and exigency. They conjure up haunting, reverb-heavy hymns to the degenerate and the broken.” –Emily Rose Epstein (SF Weekly, Thrasher Magazine, drummer for Ty Segall)


  • ryan garbes – sweet hassle – hello sunshine

    $12.00 Add to cart

    Sweet Hassle is the debut LP from Ryan Garbes (Wet Hair, Raccoo-oo-oon), fresh from his 7-inch on Arbor and his cassette on NNA. A man in a small college town hours away from the influences that foul a musicians mind, Garbes has a lot of time to hang, especially in the recording studio. On Sweet Hassle, he incorporates heavy Velvets live bootleg vibes straight from the bedroom soundboard, with a touch of melodic electronic drone and a Byrds dusting.


  • spectre folk – the blackest medicine, vol. II – woodsist

    $12.00 Add to cart

    Pete Nolan was Spectre Folk before drumming and strumming in Magik Markers was his main gig, and will be Spectre Folk long after he shuffles off this mortal coil. The main benefit of ghost-folk is: you can play it way after you’re dead, and while you’re alive the Spectre can haunt any decent willing body with a gift for the unreal. This time around, fellow Michigander Steve Shelley (Sonic Youth) runs drums, Peter Meehan (The Grey Lady) glues guitar and Aaron Mullan (Tall Firs) slithers bass, creating an alchemy the Spectre hasn’t floated since the days of basement wig-wearing in the short-lived Norman Bates era. The band entered Echo Canyon West with the intention of recording a 7-inch of the up-tempo version of “The Blackest Medicine,” the title cut from the 2007 home-fi Woodsist debut. After several sessions, they emerged with a four-song studio collage monster that won’t fit in your locker and smells like smoked banana peels and undies blowing down an alleyway. A vibraphone, piano, and a plate reverb unit the size of a Brooklyn apartment were all employed by the Spectre like Uri Gellar used spoons—inappropriately, desperate and bent. They physically turned the two-inch reel of tape over so Meehan could put subliminal backwards masking under his Erkin-Koray-worthy guitar solo on “Fourth Dimension Refs,” and Nolan put the Temple Screamer to good use on tracks one and two, using samples of Shirley Temple Black’s “Good Ship Lollipop” as vocoder harmonies on choruses. Oh yeah, it’s full of burning psych-pop jammers, too! Earmarking Nolan’s longstanding but unspoken obsession with personal hygiene, “Keep Your Teeth Clean!” is a krauty suite that betrays Shelley’s and Mullan’s recent stint as the rhythm section for Neu! Their teutonic influence has the effect of putting the dreamy psych-fuzz exhibited on last year’s Compass LP through a blender… with a frog… that spills out into a wide open Milky Way head zone. You can’t snuggle with this record, so strap yourself in and feel the Gs! Fearless as a lemming, Nolan has created a private universe here, a Society of the Spectre-cal, if you will, and his gift is his freedom. Let’s have a drift. —Elisa Ambrogio (Magik Markers)


  • the fresh and onlys – grey eyed girls – woodsist

    $11.00 Add to cart

    When Tim Cohen told Shayde Sartin he was writing a song called “Be My Hooker,” the Fresh & Onlys bassist looked at the singer/guitarist and said… “‘There’s no way we’re gonna have a song with that title, dude,'” explains Sartin. “But sure enough, he laid a riff down and I was like, ‘Jesus christ, I can’t believe you pulled something meaningful out of such a stupid line.'” Welcome to the push/pull dynamic that’s fueled the Fresh & Onlys’ steady stream of releases over the past year, including last spring’s self-titled LP (Castle Face) and this fall’s Grey-Eyed Girls (Woodsist). And to think it all started the old-fashioned way—with Sartin and Cohen simply hanging out after work, playing their favorite punk (Buzzcocks, The Mekons) and classic rock (Country Joe and the Fish, cued up alongside slabs of psych from the group’s homebase, San Francisco) records alongside a growing collection of empty beer cans. “I can’t really explain what happened or why,” says Sartin. “I guess we listened to records until we were on the same page, and from that point on, we never stopped recording.” As simple as all of that sounds, the duo first bought a tape machine five years ago. When that failed to produce any concrete cuts, Cohen focused on his previous avant-pop band, Black Fiction, and Sartin split his time between session and live work for such bands as the Skygreen Leopards, Papercuts and Citay. Not to mention his close friend Kelley Stoltz, who ended up releasing the first Fresh & Onlys 7″ (the limited Imaginary Friends EP) in early 2008. With so much music hitting shops in such a short time (Sartin says the band already has boxes of backlogged tapes), you might think the Fresh & Onlys camp have a problem with quality control. Quite the contrary; Sartin and Cohen are very careful about what they release. And while the duo writes and records the band’s songs, the arrangements are usually fleshed out with guitarist Wymond Miles, drummer Kyle Gibson, and backup singer Heidi Alexander. “If we take a song into the studio or a live setting and it doesn’t have wings,” says Sartin, “Then we just ditch it and keep the charming demo version.” The final mix of Grey-Eyed Girls sounds like a natural bridge between the raucous garage rock of the group’s debut and the full-on studio record they plan on wrapping for In the Red later this year. That goes for the galloping grooves of “Happy To Be Living,” the shadowy post-punk of “Invisible Forces,” and the firework finale freak-outs that drive “The Delusion of Man.” Not to mention a stack of hook-slinging tracks that nix any ‘shitgaze’ assumptions you may have. “We’re not trying to hide melodies or do the blown-out thing,” says Sartin. “A lot of those bands are great, but I don’t want to ever cater to what’s popular. It’s not that I’m being reactionary; we’re just trying to make recordings that are as rich and ear-friendly as possible.” It’s working.
    -woodsist


  • woods – sun and shade – woodsist

    out of stock

    “Woods is a two-headed dog asleep on the porch and a butterfly on the windowsill… a Janus, a Gemini and a screen door. The sun wont fade and the earworms will not leave, but the jams go on too long for the girl in the back who wonders if her friends are at another bar. Still, the ballads always make her cry. Woods is up there relaying the Woods-feel: Folk-rock, fuzz, tambourines, tapes and raw lunch pulled straight from the yard. Pop songs and other things: Sun and Shade.”
    -Glenn Donaldson


  • matt “mv” valentine – what i became – woodsist

    out of stock

    If string theory is correct, this is approximately the thirteenth album Matt Valentine has released that definitely shouldnt be filed under a group name (Tower Recordings, Bummer Road, Golden Road, etc.). On the other hand, if string theory is correct, this might also be his 11,000th album. The truth, one suspects, is somewhere in between. Since bedding down in southern Vermont at the dawn of the century, MV has been as cussedly prolific as anyone. The gout of LPs, cassettes, CDRs, singles and 10-inches emerging from Maximum Arousal Farm has dwarfed the output of everyone cept maybe Sunburned or Thurston. Regardless, there can never be enough MV LPs in the world, and What I Became is a beaut. Most of it is as solo as Satan, apart from percussionist Jeremy Earl (of Woods fame), whose presence is sometimes felt more than heard. Erika EE Elder and Mike Muskox Smith also pop up on a track, but the general approach here is as naked-and-loaded as the soul of Icepick Slim. As usual, MVs tunes and procedures beggar easy generification. Elements of deep forest psychedelia brush against Crazy Horse guitar / vocal flourishes that explode to reveal volk-based form mayhem at its hickiest. My particular fave here is PK Dick, a paean to nth dimensional logic in the form of a Swedish psych-folk readymade. My son prefers the haunted-Harvest-vibe (his words) of Ave. B. My wife goes for the Seventh Sons approach offered by Sweet Little Indian Girl (always a fave with the ladies). And my daughter nods in the direction of Continuing the Good Life for reasons she will not explain. I suspect its the hooty vocals, reminding her of teen pop giants like The Shins and Of Montreal, but she aint sayin. All this just goes to show that What I Became is a fun album for the whole family. It will soothe your savage breasts. It will turn your evil mother-in-law into a porpoise. It will wash yr dishes and darn yr socks. Darn them! Motherfucker, who else would do that? Nobody, Jack. Cept MV. This guy has the magic touch. And it has never been displayed better than here. Just get the fucking rec. Or prepare to go sockless. Kind of a no-brainer, eh? -Byron Coley